The Irrational Mathematicians of Giza, Part 1

Changelog is at end of part 3.

The Giza plateau is one of the most studied places on Earth, while curiously some parts remain off-limits and unexplored. Various people have studied both the pyramids themselves, and the layout of the site, in great detail, which led to various different ideas about the site plan, which are summarised/detailed here:

1. The Orion alignment: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_correlation_theory
2. The Cygnus alignment: http://www.andrewcollins.com/page/articles/Cygnus_Orion_Giza.htm
3. A possible method of how it was planned: http://members.home.nl/peregrine/The%20Geometry%20of%20Giza.html
4. Another way of drawing the site: http://www.vejprty.com/gizaplan.htm
5. Another analysis: http://home.hiwaay.net/~jalison/Art3.html
6. Online book with analysis: https://www.greatpyramidexplanation.com/en/index.html
7. Edward Nightingale’s analysis: https://grahamhancock.com/nightingalee1/
8. Golden ratios on the site plan: https://www.goldennumber.net/great-pyramid-giza-complex-golden-ratio/
9. [placeholder for another site with lots of maths, can’t find at the moment.]

I’ve done some analysis of my own, kicked off by looking for phi circles/arcs, which I learned about when I watched a documentary about the Nebra disc…

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The curious alignments of ancient monuments, part 1

While playing around and researching things, I came across a curious alignment of two sites. The first is the pyramids at Giza, the second is Göbekli Tepe in Turkey. Currently Göbekli Tepe is the oldest megalithic site discovered, and its discovery forced historians  to rewrite the history books and rethink their timeline for civilization. The site dates back to around 9000 BCE, which is long before the copper, bronze or iron ages, which would have provided some tools needed for building the monuments.

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