Publish or perish!

Well, I’m not in academia, so I won’t perish, but I have spent the last few months discovering some things about Giza which I didn’t post here. Instead I posted them as papers online (because I really don’t like the Academic Publishing business model, and probably would not have been accepted by any ‘proper’ journal anyway, because what I say is rather history-shattering…)

So the first paper was a round-up of stuff posted here, relating to the cubit:
The Beautiful Cubit System

While the other two are companion papers that rely on each other to a degree:
Diskerfery and the Four Main Giza Pyramids and
55,550 BCE and the 23 Stars of Giza

The important images are below, read the papers to get the full story 🙂

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34 Ways to calculate the Royal Cubit

Updated versions of the different ways of approximating the cubit. Also includes separate table for Grand Metre (1 plus royal cubit) == 1.5236…. == 1.524.

These are done with pi, phi, e, roots and powers (usually of basic primes), as well as ln, log, sin, cos and tan.

See square roots, cube roots and ln(4) for formulas not shown below.

Changelog at the bottom.See also The Magical Mystical Royal Cubit for the Pretty Picture version.

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The Spooky Stuff

To borrow a phrase from Robert Bauval, this falls under the Spooky Stuff category.

It is a very strange connection between the Grand Metre (1 + royal cubit), the base of the natural logarithm ⅇ, and the royal cubit as measured in inches.

Changelog:
2018-11-29: added Spooky Stuff 7 and 8
2018-12-03: added Spooky Stuff 9
2018-12-04: added Spooky Stuff 10
2019-04-24: added Spooky Stuff 11

Royal cubit, e and inch

I have no explanation for this. It just highlights again the ancient origins of the metre, inch and royal cubit, and how they mysteriously link together with π and ⅇ. But what about φ you ask?…. here you go:

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The royal cubit and the stars

There are still some things that bother me about the Royal Cubit, in particular, why did they choose π/6, and why did they use it in preference to the metre.

Something interesting related to the first question has surfaced. Which may just be another random co-incidence like all the others, or maybe not.

First up, a reminder that the Royal Cubit is ⅙ of the circumference of a circle with diameter 1 metre, in other words the arc on a 360/6 = 60° segment, as follows:

Circle, 60 degrees, royal cubit

As you may know, the ancient Egyptians were very fond of their ankh, which looks like this:

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ICYMI

Russia Today is a Russian-government aligned/supported news web site. They don’t feature a LOT of stories, but instead focus on major issues (and some sports, particularly wrestling and ice-skating, which seem popular with their readers).

The site is becoming popular as a source of “alt” news, given the high levels of propaganda and fake news emanating out of the Western main-stream media. Being a Russian-government aligned site, they do push the Russian government’s point of view, meaning some people in the west don’t trust them.

Back in the 1970s, during the height of the Cold War Continue reading

Phi redux

I started poking around Giza and ancient Egypt after watching a video on the Nebra disk, and trying to find a similar circle-split-by-phi in the alignments of the Giza pyramids.

I didn’t find what I was looking for at the time (in terms of phi being in the alignment of all three pyramids) but did find lots of other things, including phi between P1 and P3.

In the mean time, the so-called Genetic Disc from Peru came along, and I immediately noticed a similar division there. Here’s the two sides of the disk:

Genetic disk from Peru

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